Hopeful Protein

high protein yogurt drink, home made Danimals SmoothieMy child would be a vegetarian, except for chicken nuggets and turkey pepperoni. I know I’m not alone in this, but still, it’s disheartening.

Why? Vegetarianism is good, right? Yes. If you still consume the correct amount of protein. Tofu! you cry. He won’t touch the stuff, and he can smell even the silkenest of tofu in his food a mile away. Beans! you extoll. Nope, excepting every once in while, he will eat hummus with his baby carrots. Nuts? you wonder (assuming he has no allergy, which is true). He doesn’t like nut butters, and only eats the occasional almond, as mood or whim might strike.

Have I mentioned picky eaters make me insane? Not reacting like a hell-beast is a daily struggle.

He’s good about dairy and cheese, so we work those into his diet as much as we can, but some days it just isn’t enough. He likes edamame, but tires of them if we try to give them too him too often. I sneak flaxseed into baked goods sometimes, but it’s not a reliable source.

Pediasure, suggested the Doc, as a last resort. Upon hearing that, my wallet shriveled up and cringed in a corner of my messenger bag, hiding itself away amongst the dessicated fruit and crusty tissues.

So, I pulled up Google and researched home made Pediasure. Feh. He doesn’t need a high calorie meal replacement, and he eats whole grains, yogurt, fruits and veggies; he takes his vitamins. He just needs a protein boost. All the recipes I found called for ice cream, frozen fruit, liquid vitamin solutions, apple juice, and whey protein.

But wait! He loves those drinkable yogurts.

And so today, we got out the blender–because it’s all about the kitchen appliances–and made our own high protein drinkable yogurt. He tells me it goes great with a cheese sandwich on whole wheat, with a side of sugar snap peas.

Into the blender with a quart of Stonyfield Lowfat Strawberry Yogurt, 2 cups of 1% milk, and 2 scoops of Whole Foods 365 whey protein powder in Vanilla. He drinks it in 4oz servings, which by my quick calculations have about 7 grams of protein in them. He says it’s better than a Danimals “Smoothie,” with 3 times the protein, and a fraction of the cost.

14 responses to “Hopeful Protein

  1. Look at you, Martha Stewart! But much cooler. Am impressed.

  2. My boys LOVE smoothies. I throw some frozen blueberries in. Yum!

  3. lifelong vegetarian here who has never worried about my own protein intake or the protein consumed by my kids. they’re fine. not that your yogurty concoction doesn’t sound delicious!
    also, my kids like “squeezy yogurt” from TJ’s as a variation on the regular kind. does small boy like it?

  4. Amy loved smoothies! I drank them too. We are both still hooked on them. Good for you for coming up with your own better cheaper recipe too:)

  5. I may have just pinned this. because my kid can ALWAYS use healthier options in his diet. Fricking kids and their picky eating.

  6. I totally need my kids to eat more protein. We ARE vegetarian so it’s a struggle for the entire family. I always run into issues with the weird aftertastes of protein powders. That and many of them upset my stomach which is totally annoying.

    I should try the yogurt smoothies with added protein powder…how long can you safely refrigerate your creation?

    • Carrie, I feel you on the weird aftertaste thing. The WF365 stuff is light on weirdness. I’ve had in in the fridge for 24 hours so far, with no ill-effects. It needs a shake before you pour. I’m going to keep it around for four of five days, unless it decides to behave poorly before then.

  7. I was the unpickiest kid in the history of kids. My parents tell me that I’d say “no” to a restaurant because I had tried everything on the menu.

    So, yeah, picky kids drive me batty as well. Fortunately, mine are eating most whatever we put in front of them. And, when they won’t eat something, it’s not difficult to find something similar that they will.

    All that said, I really like the idea of homemade anything, especially if it gets the kids eating/drinking protein-rich foods. So I’ll be trying this.

  8. Cameron, that is ingenious! And your wallet can stop cowering in the corner now…

  9. I’m curious why his pediatrician said he needed more protein. Kids his age actually need very little protein, on the order of an ounce a day or so. Most kids get enough just from dairy products (assuming no dairy allergy). If the pediatrician has a real concern, (s)he could (should?) refer you to a pediatric nutritionist for help. We took the boy to one a few months ago and found it helpful.

  10. Score one point for Mom! I’m so impressed by kitchen skills that don’t involve a microwave. Here’s hoping meals at your house go smoothie-ly from now on.

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